icon vimeofacebook
Mar 04 2021

Plants and Farming: A lesson for a Missionary Discipleship



Plants and Farming: A lesson for a Missionary Discipleship  (Texte en Français en bas) by
Silvester Asa, cicm
General Councilor


I remember distinctly that mo­ment when, on a visit to my mother’s hometown in Atapupu on the

northern coast of Timor Island, some of my High School class­mates, a group called “Smansa86”, [1] presented me with a Timorese sandalwood tree which was nicely wrapped in a plastic bag.

I was so delighted with this gift. For one thing, Timorese san­dalwood was so precious that, in olden times, the Chinese mer­chants who traveled to Timor in­termarried with daughters of na­tive Timorese rulers and em­braced the matriarchal system prevalent in Timor so that they could gain easy access to the san­dalwood trade.[2] Subsequently, the Europeans, notably the Portuguese and the Dutch, also showed great interest in sandal­wood trade that lured them to Timor, marking the beginning of decades of Western colonization of the Timorese people. Sadly, at present, due to overharvesting, one can hardly find a sandalwood tree in the land where it used to grow.[3]

As planned, I planted this san­dalwood tree near the tombs of my maternal grandparents. I took some pictures of it and sent them to my High School classmates. Upon seeing the picture, a class­mate who works at the Forestry Department asked me what had happened to the small plants that grew around the young sandal­wood tree in the plastic bag they had given me. Because I thought they were wild plants that would hinder the growth of the sandal­wood tree, so I decided to pluck them out. Little did I know that those plants were grown together with the sandalwood tree to sup­port its growth.

I could not help but recall this particularly embarrassing experi­ence when I read some articles of Robin Wall Kimmerer. I also won­der if my action was a little better than those of the settlers who ar­rived in North America for the first time. Ironically, even though they ate from the fruits of the garden produced by the Native Americans, the settlers belittled the Native American way of farming. Ob­viously, for those settlers, a garden was “straight rows of single spe­cies, not a three-dimensional sprawl of abundance”, [4] a form of agriculture the native people have practiced from the time immemorial.

Understandably, each culture has different views and practices in farming. What is quite disturbing is the settlers' attitude when facing a way of farming that differs from their own. While the native people “speak of this gardening style as the Three Sisters,”[5] where corn, beans and squash grow together, just like asters and goldenrod can grow together in perfect harmony and in turn evoke not only one’s sense of beauty but also nourishes human beings’ bodily needs, [6] the settlers looked at such farming condescendingly.

Roger Schroeder, SVD, de­scribed a missionary endeavor as “entering into someone else’s gar­den”.[7] Indeed, a missionary may be likened to someone entering into someone else’s garden. What is required of them is respect, pru­dence and humility. Lest they will be busy chasing their own “cul­tural shadows”.[8] Worse still, they will uproot some of those plants that have grown in the garden long before their arrival, thinking that they are weeds. As it has happened in the past, with all their noble in­tentions to spread the Gospel, some Christians considered the indigenous peoples inferior and advocated conquest rather than witnessing the Gospel values, which unfortunately resulted in the annihilation of not only a cul­ture but also a people.[9]

Indeed, the experience I had in Timor and Kimmerer’s work serve as a stark reminder of the danger of acting recklessly in the field of the Lord. They can also serve as an invi­tation for us to “seek the thread that connects the world, to join instead of divide”. [10] As religious CICM missionaries, we are “sent to the nations to announce the Good News, wherever our mis­sionary presence is most needed, especially where the Gospel is not known or lived”.[11] Our going forth, moving away from our own cultures to be religious missiona­ries in a culture different from our own does not detach us from our own cultures, for we will always carry with us our own cultural shadows wherever we go, as Peter Koh and Jan Swyngedouw have so poignantly noted.[12] Hopefully, the awareness of our own sha­dows enriches us in our encounter with the culture of the people to whom we are sent.

Indeed, for all my encounters with those who are “culturally holy other”, [13] I will always re­main a Timorese, born in a land once famous for its sandalwood. But as a religious CICM missionary, I can dream of and work for a garden where the san­dalwood tree grows amidst asters and goldenrod and provides sup­port for the three sisters: corn, beans, and pumpkins. Such a gar­den would offer a beautiful sight of purple and yellow from the as­ters and goldenrod, bodily nourishment from the three sis­ters, healing and comfort to the broken soul from the therapeuti­cally aromatic scent of the sandal­wood. ■ 

[1] Smansa is an abbreviation of “SMA Satu.” SMA is Senior High School in Indonesia. “86” refers to the year we entered High School in 1986 (Batch 1986).
[2] Agni Malagina and Syefri Luwis. Koin Kuno Spanyol dan Kisah Rempah Wangi di Pulau Timor (Antique Spanish Coins and the Tale of Timorese Scented Spices) on National Geographic Indonesia, posted on February 8, 2019. Accessed on January 1, 2021. https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/131623619/koin-kuno-spanyol-dan-kisah-rempah-wangi-cendana-di-pulau-timor?page=2
[3] Sigiranus Marutho Bere. Pohon Cendana di Timor Nyaris Punah, (Timorese sandalwood, at the Brink of Extinction) posted on April 3, 2012, accessed on January 1, 2021. https://regional.kompas.com/read/2012/04/03/16514511/Pohon.Cendana.di.Timor.Nyaris.Punah
[4] Robin Wall Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. The Three Sisters (Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2013), 129.
[5] Kimmerer. Braiding, 131.
[6] Robin Wall Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. Asters and Goldenrod (Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2013), 46.
[7] Stephen B. Bevans and Roger P. Schroeder. Prophetic Dialogue: Reflections on Christian Mission Today (Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books, 2011), 33-4
[8] Peter Koh Joo-Kheng, CICM and Jan Swyngedouw, CICM, Our Cultural Shadows: Letters From and To A Young Missionary (Quezon City: Claretian Publications, 1998), xii.
[9] Stephen B. Bevans and Roger P. Schroeder. Constant in Context: A Theology of Mission for Today (New York: Orbis Books, 2004), 176.
[10] Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass. 42.
[11] Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Constitutions and General Directory. Article 2. (Roma, 1988), 14.
[12] Koh, Our Cultural Shadows, xii.
[13] In his public lecture at Catholic Theological Union, CTU Chicago on “Interculturality and Leadership in Consecrated Life,” Antonio M. Pernia, SVD., spoke of “culturally other.” Thus, “Culturally Holy Other” is an addition from me based on Pernia’s lecture. Video Lecture at CTU, accessed on January 6, 2021.  https://learn.ctu.edu/antonio-pernia-monday/

=
=============================
Plantes et agriculture : Leçon pour un disciple missionnaire

par 
Silvester Asa, cicm
Conseiller général

Je me souviens très bien de ce moment où, lors d'une visite dans la ville natale de ma mère à Atapupu, sur la côte nord de l'île de Timor, certains de mes camarades de classe du lycée, un groupe ap­pelé « Smansa86 », [1] m'ont offert un santal timorais qui était bien emballé dans un sac en plastique.

J'ai été ravi de ce cadeau. D'une part, le bois de santal timorais était si précieux que, dans les temps an­ciens, les marchands chinois qui se rendaient au Timor se mariaient avec les filles des dirigeants timo­rais et adoptaient le système ma­triarcal en vigueur au Timor afin de pouvoir accéder facilement au commerce du bois de santal.[2] Par la suite, les Européens, notam­ment les Portugais et les Néerlan­dais, ont également manifesté un grand intérêt au commerce du bois de santal, ce qui les a attirés au Timor et a marqué le début de dé­cennies de colonisation occiden­tale des Timorais. Malheureuse­ment, à l'heure actuelle, en raison de la surexploitation, il est difficile de trouver un santal sur les terres où il poussait. [3]

Comme prévu, j'ai planté cet arbre de santal près des tombes de mes grands-parents maternels. J'ai pris quelques photos de ce santal nouvellement planté et les ai envoyées à mes camarades de classe du lycée. En voyant la photo, un camarade de classe qui travaille au département des fo­rêts m'a demandé ce qui était ar­rivé aux petites plantes qui pous­saient autour du jeune santal dans le sac en plastique qu'ils m'avaient donné. Comme je pen­sais qu'il s'agissait de plantes sau­vages qui gêneraient la croissance du santal, j'avais décidé de les ar­racher. Je ne savais pas que ces plantes poussaient avec le santal pour servir de support nécessaire à la croissance de ce dernier.

Je n'ai pas pu m'empêcher de me rappeler cette expérience particuliè­rement embarrassante lorsque j'ai lu certains articles de Robin Wall Kimmerer. Je me suis même de­mandé si mon action n'était pas un peu plus efficace que celle des colonisateurs qui sont arrivés en Amérique du Nord pour la première fois. Paradoxalement, même s'ils mangeaient des fruits du jardin produits par les Amérindiens, les colonisateurs ont dénigré la ma­nière dont ces derniers pratiquaient l'agriculture. Il est évident que pour ces colonisateurs, un jardin était « des rangées droites d'une seule espèce, et non pas un étalement tridimensionnel de l'abondance », [4] une forme d’agriculture pratiquée par les autochtones depuis des temps immémoriaux.

Il est compréhensible que chaque culture ait des vues et des pratiques différentes en matière d'agriculture. Ce qui est assez in­quiétant, c'est l'attitude des coloni­sateurs face à un mode d’agricul­ture différent du leur. Alors que les autochtones « parlent de ce style de jardinage comme des Trois Sœurs », [5]où le maïs, les haricots et les courges poussent ensemble, tout comme les asters et les verges d'or peuvent pousser ensemble en parfaite harmonie et évoquent à leur tour non seulement le sens de la beauté mais aussi les besoins corporels de l'être humain, [6]les co­lonisateurs regardaient cette agri­culture avec condescendance.

Roger Schroeder, SVD, a décrit une entreprise missionnaire comme « entrer dans le jardin de quelqu'un d'autre ».[7] En effet, les mission­naires peuvent être assimilés à des gens qui entrent dans le jardin de quelqu'un d'autre. Ce qu'on attend d'eux, c'est du respect, de la pru­dence et de l'humilité pour éviter qu’ils poursuivent leurs propres « ombres culturelles ». [8] Pire en­core, ils déracineraient cer­taines des plantes qui ont poussé dans le jardin bien avant leur arrivée, pensant qu'il s'agit de mauvaises herbes. Comme cela s'est produit par le passé, malgré toutes les nobles in­tentions de répandre l'Évangile, cer­tains chrétiens ont considéré les peuples indigènes comme infé­rieurs et ont prôné la conquête plu­tôt que le témoignage des valeurs de l'Évangile, ce qui a malheureuse­ment entraîné l'anéantissement non seulement d'une culture mais aussi de tout un peuple. [9]

En effet, l'expérience que j'ai vé­cue au Timor et le travail de Kimmerer servent de rappel écla­tant du danger d'agir de manière imprudente dans le champ du Seigneur. Ils peuvent aussi servir d'invitation à « chercher le fil qui relie le monde, à unir au lieu de di­viser ». [10] En tant que mission­naires religieux CICM, nous sommes « envoyés aux nations pour annoncer la Bonne Nouvelle où notre présence missionnaire est le plus nécessaire, spécialement où l’Évangile n’est pas connu ou vécu ». [11] Le fait que nous partions, que nous nous détachions de nos propres cultures pour être des mis­sionnaires religieux dans une cul­ture différente de la nôtre ne nous libère pas de nos propres cultures. Nous emporterons toujours avec nous nos propres ombres cultu­relles partout où nous irons, comme l'ont si bien souligné Peter Koh et Jan Swyngedouw.[12] Il faut espérer que la prise de cons­cience de nos propres ombres nous enrichisse mutuellement dans notre rencontre avec la culture des gens auxquels nous sommes en­voyés.

En effet, malgré toutes mes rencontres avec ceux qui sont « Culturally Holy Other », [13] je resterai toujours un Timorais, né dans un pays autrefois célèbre pour son bois de santal. Mais en tant que missionnaire religieux CICM, je peux rêver et travailler pour un jardin où le santal pousse au milieu des asters et de la verge d'or et soutient les trois sœurs : maïs, haricots et courges. Un tel jardin offrirait une belle vue de violet et de jaune des as­ters et de la verge d'or, une ali­mentation corporelle des trois sœurs, la guérison et le réconfort de l'âme brisée par le par­fum thérapeutique et aromatique du santal.

[1] Smansa est une abréviation de "SMA Satu". SMA est l'abréviation du "Lycée" en Indonésie. "86" fait référence à l'année d'entrée au lycée en 1986 (Promotion 1986).
[2] Agni Malagina et Syefri Luwis. Koin Kuno Spanyol dan Kisah Rempah Wangi di Pulau Timor (Antique Spanish Coins and the Tale of Timorese Scented Spices) on National Geographic Indonesia, posté le 8 février 2019. Consulté le 1er janvier 2021. https://nationalgeographic.grid.id/read/131623619/koin-kuno-spanyol-dan-kisah-rempah-wangi-cendana-di-pulau-timor?page=2
[3] Sigiranus Marutho Bere. Pohon Cendana di Timor Nyaris Punah, (Timorese Sandalwood, at the Brink of Extinction) publié le 3 avril 2012, consulté le 1er janvier 2021. https://regional.kompas.com/read/2012/04/03/16514511/Pohon.Cendana.di.Timor.Nyaris.Punah
[4] Robin Wall Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. The Three Sisters (Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2013), 129.
[5] Kimmerer. Braiding, p.131.
[6] Robin Wall Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. Asters and Goldenrod (Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2013), 46.
[7] Stephen B. Bevans et Roger P. Schroeder. Prophetic Dialogue: Reflections on Christian Mission Today (Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books, 2011), 33-4
[8] Peter Koh Joo-Kheng, CICM et Jan Swyngedouw, CICM, Our Cultural Shadows: Letters From and To A Young Missionary (Quezon City: Claretian Publications, 1998), xii.
[9] Stephen B. Bevans et Roger P. Schroeder. Constant in Context: A Theology of Mission for Today (New York: Orbis Books, 2004), 176.
[10] Kimmerer. Braiding Sweetgrass. 42.
[11] Congrégation du Coeur Immaculé de Marie. Constitutions et Directoire commun. Article 2. (Rome, 1988), 14.
[12] Koh, Our Cultural Shadows, xii.
[13] Dans sa conférence publique à la Catholic Theological Union, CTU Chicago sur " Interculturality and Leadership in Consecrated Life ", Antonio M. Pernia, SVD, a parlé de " culturally other". Ainsi, " Culturally Holy Other " est un ajout de ma part basé sur la conférence de Pernia. Conférence vidéo à la CTU, consultée le 6 janvier 2021.https://learn.ctu.edu/antonio-pernia-monday/

Read 1106 times Last modified on Wednesday, 17 March 2021 08:24

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

The use of a cookie is a must-have for the quest to be a favorite of all serviced offerings. The accessibility of these services and the use of the service involves the use of the cookie